1. Skydevaaben.com For Husqvarna Serial Numbers Not Working Anymore?
  2. Husqvarna 30-06 Rifle. What Model? [Archive] - Gunboard's ..

Made in 1967. Looks to be, probably, a model 1600, but that would be easier to tell with some pictures of the entire gun, not just the buttplate and the name. Husqvarna Vapenfabriks Aktiebolag (Husqvarna Weapons-fabricator, Incorporated-Company) made guns, for both military and civilian use, from 1689 to the late 1960s.

The model number of a Husqvarna chainsaw is printed on the side of the recoil assembly on the unit(eg. 455, 460, 372 XP). Husqvarna chainsaws also have a small metal plate stamped with the model number, part number, and serial number. The plate is typically located in one of four locations.

Most other parts have the last three figures of the serial number. (Except for carbines with four-digit serial numbers, on these the other parts only have the last two figures in the serial number). Parts on Husqvarna made rifles are not numbered to the same extent as on rifles made by Mauser or Carl Gustaf.

They also made, among other things, stoves, motorcycles, bicycles, chain saws and sewing machines. But mostly they made civilian firearms. In the late '60s they sold the 'gun part' of the business to Carl Gustav, and have since gone to being the world's largest producer of 'outdoor power equipment' - garden tractors, chain saws, weed-whackers, etc. Edit: I just noticed I forgot to mention they are Swedish. I think it is a very interesting rifle and needs to be cleaned. I borrowed it from my cousin to let my 12 yr old shoot it this year for deer season. I've fired it a few times but I need to spend some time to try to sight it in or see if I need to replace the scope.

That's what started this journey in the first place. Do you know if these where sold in the states or could this have been bought over seas. I believe my uncle oringally may have purchased it while stationed in Germany. We are still trying to put the time line together has he passed away a few years ago. It's funny how you only find the question once the answers have left you!.

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  1. I was hoping that someone could help me with the model number on a Swedish Husqvarna Rifle. The action is an exact replica of a Mauser model 98 except it has the sportorized half safety for the mounting of the scope. The serial number is 112383. The barrel is stamped Husqvarna Vapenfabriks A.B.30-06 U.S.
  2. Husqvarna 1896 6.5x55 (R26264) Description: Husqvarna 1896 6.5x55 caliber rifle. Swedish military Mauser manufactured in 1944 (late production). Serial numbers are matching. Bore is excellent. Very good overall condition.
  3. I was hoping that someone could help me with the model number on a Swedish Husqvarna Rifle. The action is an exact replica of a Mauser model 98 except it has the sportorized half safety for the mounting of the scope. The serial number is 112383. The barrel is stamped Husqvarna Vapenfabriks A.B.30-06 U.S.

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Husqvarna Vapenfabriks Serial Numbers

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. NOTES FOR VISITORS: Welcome to the Alaska Outdoors Supersite forums! The contents of our forums are viewable by anyone, and may be read by clicking the forum headings below. To post in the forums, you must register. To upgrade or change your membership, please and select Upgrade Supporting Membership. Your account will now be managed separately from the forum system. Forum login is separate from account management but shares the same username and password.

IMPORTANT: If you cannot log-in, please reset your password using our new 6 character format through and click Forgot Password. An email message with a reset link will be sent to your email address. I recently bought an HVA action that is missing the serial number. I just disassembled it today, cleaned it up a little with some nitro solvent and I can't find a serial number on it.

Was planning on using it to have a rifle built, now I am at a loss. I would like to find out if anyone knows if the manufacturer ever made some of these actions and did not stamp a serial number on them. Can I still have a gunsmith built me a rifle with it?

Here is a description of the action: Husqvarna Crown trademark and the word SWEDEN stamped on the top of the receiver ring. Proofmark and word Nitro stamped on the flat under receiver ring behind the recoil lug, (missing serial number). Left Receiver wall is stamped with HVA ACTION-MADE IN SWEDEN Trigger guard magazine feels light, must be some sort of alloy material. All of the stamped markings are deep and very visible.

Bolt has a magnum bolt face, magazine box easily accomodates medium magnum cartridges. Please advise?

The first Husky made action is the 1640 action. It was made from 1953 to 1967.

This is likely what you have. It should have a long Mauser extractor and mechanical ejector with a sliding safety button. The rifle models with this action are 1640, 1740, 2100, 1600,( Calibers would have been 6.5x55, 270, 30-06, 8x57, 9.3x62) model 1651 (358 Mag only), 3000, 6000, or 7000 (243, 308, 270, 30-06, 9.3x62 and 7mm Mag). These rifles may have made without S/N's because no one cared way back then. Many were imported without serial numbers as it wasn't required until after the GCA act of 1968. I think your Gunsmith can make a rifle on the action but may have to stamp a number on it. Many guns still exist without serial numbers and are traded quite frequently.

I've never had a gun made on an action with out. Your smith should know the rules. Big Al, so there would not be any legal issues with me or a gunsmith stamping a serial number on the action since it does not have one.

I will talk to the gunsmith about this before I start on the rifle project. The Swedish action looks well done and is pretty smooth when I cycle the bolt. Haven't really decided what to built with the action yet though. May consider another 358 NM or a 375 Ruger or one of it's variants, that is after I finish up the two other rifle projects I am planning. Anyone have any opinions about these Swedish made rifle actions, just curious. Are they good quality or are there issues with them that I should be aware of before I start my planning? Big Al, so there would not be any legal issues with me or a gunsmith stamping a serial number on the action since it does not have one.

Skydevaaben.com For Husqvarna Serial Numbers Not Working Anymore?

I will talk to the gunsmith about this before I start on the rifle project. The Swedish action looks well done and is pretty smooth when I cycle the bolt. Haven't really decided what to built with the action yet though. May consider another 358 NM or a 375 Ruger or one of it's variants, that is after I finish up the two other rifle projects I am planning.

Anyone have any opinions about these Swedish made rifle actions, just curious. Are they good quality or are there issues with them that I should be aware of before I start my planning? Thanks It matters not one wit what is done in another country regarding where the serial number is placed on the rifle. What matters is that the serial number is on the action in the U.S. This is the only way your gunsmith can stay in compliance when he enters the information in his long book to remain in compliance with the regulations his license agreement requires. As to the action, just remember that the receiver ring is smaller (in dia) than a large ring Mauser.

Not much but there is a difference. Vary good actions, I have several and am always on the lookout for more, as they are a prefered action for light weight sheep rifles. If I had the kind of requirements for a long range accurate rifle for caribou.

I would barrel and chamber for the 6.5/.284. Great killer for everything you could want to kill in your neck of the wood/tundra. Vary good bullets are available for this caliber. Being as how most hunting out west is done from a boat, I would get a long heavy barrel installed by one of the top makers. I would chose Hart, Shillien or any maker like them or Kreiger that builds and installs their own barrels.

To finish up, I would get a good stock installed by one of the better stock makers. Why try to reinvent the wheel when we already have ctgs with proven track records for accuracy.

By the way you won't find better than the 6.5 for shooting in the winds. I've yet to hunt where you are for caribou, when the wind is not blowing. Big Al, Comparing the two mauser designs, the Small Ring with a 1 1/4' Front Receiver Ring and the Large Ring with a 1 3/8' Front Receiver Ring. My question is; what are the maximum pressure levels for each? When I checked the bolt face on the HVA with a fired magnum case it fit perfectly, so that kinda limits my options for cartridge selection. After reading your thread yesterday I read up on other available 6.5mm cartridges, one that came to mind was a 264 Winchester Magnum. For some odd reason the majority of Native men (older generation) prefer 264 WMs, and there is a fledgling following of younger men coming up through the ranks that also prefer this cartridge.

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Suprisingly, it is not just here in my village, most of the surrounding villages also have a pretty good 264 WM following. I owned one about 7 years ago, never hunted with it though. Sold it to my cousin who has used it on caribou and moose, he still prefers it over any other rifle he owns.

Must be a pretty good round. It matters not one wit what is done in another country regarding where the serial number is placed on the rifle. What matters is that the serial number is on the action in the U.S. This is the only way your gunsmith can stay in compliance when he enters the information in his long book to remain in compliance with the regulations his license agreement requires.Al & Allen, I think all guns manufactured after 1968 or imported after 1968 must have a serial number on the receiver.

Some guns imported without S/N's on them had serial numbers numbers stamped on them by the importer as were model numbers and Husky falls into that category. Also several of my Husky's have had serial numbers stamped on them under the stock (bottom of the action)and were restamped on the barrel or else where to have a readily visable s/n. This may have to do with import laws before 1968. I don't know about a smith 'making' a rifle from an existing action without a serial number.

He may have to stamp it. A good chance for a custom serial number. A question of you in regard to the large ring/small ring actions. Husky history says Husky made rifles on 96 actions as well as FN M98 actions. Then of course went to their own actions maunfactured in Sweden. Are the FN 98 actions all large ring?

Are the small ring actions just 96 style receivers? Or are the small ring Husky rifles actions m98's with smaller front rings? 'A question of you in regard to the large ring/small ring actions. Husky history says Husky made rifles on 96 actions as well as FN M98 actions. Then of course went to their own actions manufactured in Sweden. Are the FN 98 actions all large ring? Are the small ring actions just 96 style receivers?

Or are the small ring Husky rifles actions m98's with smaller front rings?' Copyright laws prohibit me from coping what Volume II of Stuart Otteson's book 'THE BOLT ACTION' has to say in chapter 12 under the title 'Carl Gustaf. Put simply the HVA rifle's action imported by Tradewinds in 1955 through the time of the new action was the 1640 that you mentioned earlier was a compromise between Model 98 and the earlier Model 94 and 96 small ring actions manufactured by Carl Gustaf.

It is a long and vary interesting history and far to long for me to try and improve on the work of Stuart Otteson. Remember that the receiver ring on the Model 98 is 1.3' and these on the 1640 is 1.290'. The actions that replaced the 1640 was designed by Gunnar Larsson in 1965 and did not go into production until 1967 this was the Model 1900 and as nice as this NEW action is, it could not be mistaken for a Mauser action as it is a push feed action. The 1640 action does have a good position into days highly specialised custom gunmakers market as they are highly desirable for the guy that wants the best in a sheep rifle and demands the reliability of a controlled feed action. It was for this reason of the best rifles and ctgs for the sheep hunter, that I asked Woodleigh to bring out bullets in 6.5mm which they did. I explained to them that a good deal of the time sheep hunters in our Alaska are hunting in country that has grizzly bear. Even though sheep do not need the type of bullet that Woodleigh makes, the safety provided by them would add a degree of reliability to the hunter in need of extended coverage.

None of the 1640 actions are Model 98's as they do not have the rail cutout or stripper clip slot. Triggers are of course different. As to the similarities between the two, is much the same. I think all of this leads to the question of which is the better action the FN commercial actions or the 1640 HVA action.

I simply answer, that both have a place in consideration for the hunter. Naturally the FN has a much larger field for consideration. Here is a shocker for the Mauser lovers out there in gun nut land.

Your government now prohibits the importation of all Mauser action and rifles with the rail cutout and stripper clip slots. No matter that the rifle was always a commercial item. Ain't government just great? Big Al, Comparing the two Mauser designs, the Small Ring with a 1 1/4' Front Receiver Ring and the Large Ring with a 1 3/8' Front Receiver Ring.

My question is; what are the maximum pressure levels for each? When I checked the bolt face on the HVA with a fired magnum case it fit perfectly, so that kinda limits my options for cartridge selection. After reading your thread yesterday I read up on other available 6.5mm cartridges, one that came to mind was a 264 Winchester Magnum. For some odd reason the majority of Native men (older generation) prefer 264 WMs, and there is a fledgling following of younger men coming up through the ranks that also prefer this cartridge. Surprisingly, it is not just here in my village, most of the surrounding villages also have a pretty good 264 WM following. I owned one about 7 years ago, never hunted with it though. Sold it to my cousin who has used it on caribou and moose, he still prefers it over any other rifle he owns.

Husqvarna rifle serial number search

Must be a pretty good round.My dislike for the barrel eating.264 WINCHESTER mag knows no bounds. That is the fastest throat eating round I ever loaded for, bar none. That said, I love the 6.5mm bullets and have had a love affair with them for more the 40 years. The term 'overbore capacity' so often used By the late PARKER ACKLEY, applies to the.264 Winny. I went through the problems that the 6.5/06 gives a shooter and rebarreled because of the problems. I have been through more 6.5 barrels than any other caliber (except.22 and 6mm for benchrest).

Why because that is the caliber that has interested me more than any other since my first.264 Win mag in 1963. For a long range flat shooting bullet, you just have to lay the first prize at this caliber's feet.

Of course I'm mean by that, a rifle that you don't need a forklift to carry. WE forget that the people that we are talking about, if they are hunters only and not shooters also are well served by all the factory loadings. They are not shooting hundreds of rounds a year.

If I could have only one 6.5mm? Hands down it would be the 6.5x55mm Sweed. Give me a truck load of ammo and a few barrels and I would be well satisfied.

About your question in regards to bolt face, yes the bolts are the same the only difference is the bolt face and the extractor for all the ctgs ever chambered in these actions. All the working pressures considered safe will work fine in both actions. Does that mean that the larger ring is not stronger? In reference to the ring of course that part is stronger, but that is not to big of a consideration as other areas will fail first. When it comes to handling excess gas pressure. Everybody that designs bolt actions, first starts with Mauser and then makes small changes.

Look at all the top dollar, after market hunting actions (controlled feed) and they are nothing more than a copy of the Mauser with a lot of small improvements. Why do I harp on the 6.5/.284? That is right at the point of max bore capacity for the 6.5mm. Good barrel life is still to be had with this ctg, but it can be pushed to the point where that is not always true. When you live in the bush, you have to know what's always going to be on the shelf in the village store (unless you reload), for this reason only, a guy really has to think about what's going to be available. Thanks AL, That was a good lesson on Huskys.

I have Otteson's first book and it has become a great reference. I would like to get hold of the volume II but haven't seen it lately. To me when we say small ring Mauser we are talking about the Swedish M94, 96, 38 and in general any M98 is large ring. I know there are exceptions but with the Husky rifles we had the small ring Swedish Mauser based guns, the FN M98 based and then the 1640 actions, etcetera. The later push feeders are so different.

Husqvarna 30-06 Rifle. What Model? [Archive] - Gunboard's ..

The 1640 is an M98 with different trigger, safety, bolt stop, bolt shroud, so it still qualifies as a Mauser. The side rail cut and the stripper notch are lost form the later model FN Mausers but I've only seen one Husky M98 that had no stripper notch but many without the side cut. I have here a M98 FN made without side rail cut and with a stripper notch, with a Mauser trigger and safety. It is a Husqvarna model 640 and is stamped M640 and the name SARCO and something else I can't make out. (The importer I presume.) This stamp is on the bottom of the barrel just aft of the barrel mounted sling mount. On the top of the barrel forward of the rear sight is stamped HUSQVARNA VAPPENFABRIKS A. This is a post 1948 action with out the side rail cut out and is obviously an FN action with the FN box magazine and the trap door floor plate but with the recessed floor plate latch, requiring a bullet tip or other such instrument to open it.

It has the true Mauser bolt and three position safety and the C cut breach. The serial number is stamped on the left side of the front ring above the proof mnark and below the stock line. This serial number is also stamped on the barrel, left side just aft of the rear sight, above the stock line.

The barrel stamp is smaller and looks more uniform and professional making me think the receiver was stamped after manufacture, but maybe not. The top of the ring has the crown, the gothic 'H' and the word 'SWEDEN'.

This front receiver ring measures 1.425' in diameter. It is a very nice specimen of the 1950's Husqvarna's civilian sporting rifle. Is this pretty much in harmony with what you know about these rifles? Nothing out of the ordinary? I have a suspicion that what you have is a re-barreled and stamp added civilian marksman's action. Do search through the usual Mauser books and I think you will find that rifle and action pictured in it's competitive clothing.

Think about the great love the swead's had for the 6.5x55mm for just about ever. The bolt face for the 8x57mm being the same. I have a memory of these vary nice Sweed rifles from the 50's era. I think I would start my search with Ludwig Olson's page 275 of 'Mauser BOLT RIFLES'. Now with all that said, you need to unload that POS, you can keep the barrel and stock, even the trigger.

I have lots to trade or I have cash. I have a ton of info, but lack the time to type it all out. Does that action have a flat bolt knob? Does it have the push button bottom trap door magazine? I can't see all of it in the pics. I noticed it is without a bolt shroud safety, these were with the Sako triggers.

A standard Sako trigger and safety will fit if you want that type of trigger. They are a really good, fully adjustable box trigger. Th FN action with the left side two position flag safety (FN safety) on the action without the thumb cut or stripper notch and with the Mauser trigger are called the Deluxe action. Then came the Supreme action which has the Sako trigger and safety and all but the earliest ones had the flat bolt knob.

These were generally D&T for scope and receiver sights. Yours looks round and would be a transition model, some characteristics of each. Is this the one without a serial number? A lot of the actions were imported (without serial numbers) into the country to make rifles here during the 1950's. I recently bought a Sears & Roebuck, J.C.

Higgins 30-06 of the '50's and it is D&T for scope mounts and has the flat knob and flag safety (2 pos) but a funny 'Sears' trigger which I dislike and will need to replace it. The trigger is pinned into the triger gaurd housing with a small spring for 'pull resistance' and the sear is pinned to the bottom of the receiver. If you loosen a bedding screw, the sear will release. These were the stupidest triggers I've ever seen and this one must go. I'd like to find a standard Mauser trigger and sear for this one and it is going to become my 400 Thuma. This one is based on the improved 376 Steyr case and will exceed the 450/400 Nitro Express ballistics.

I like the Deluxe FN actions. I want a 'C' cut breach and a Mauser trigger with the bolt shroud 2 position (FN) flag safety. I really like the trap door bottom with the extended (FN) push button release. I want the standard FN scope base hole spacing.

Leupold, Warne, Talley and just about everybody makes bases for that pattern. I have several rifles made on this action and I will buy all I can get. Like I said, I like the FN Mauser actions. You have a very good one, there. HVA has a round bolt knob, magazine floorplate release button on inside of trigger guard, no bolt safety shroud, no adjustment screws on trigger and yes the bolt release is the little button release type on the left side of the action.

D&T for both scope mounts and receiver sight (right side). FN has a flat checkered area on the action side of the knob, D&T for both scope mounts and a receiver sight (right side), serial number is located on the flat area under the receiver ring behind recoil lug (just one single numeric digit), flat type magazine floor plate release button located on the front of the trigger guard.